Guidebook

Tokyo is the capital of Japan. The public transportation there is the Tokyo Metro, and it moves about 6 million passengers every day. Tokyo is a bustling metropolis, and it is likely where you will be flying in and out of.

The country is very favorable towards cyclists, and getting around via bicycle is one of the more common modes of transportation.

The easiest and cheapest way to get around the country is with a Japan Rail pass. It allows you unlimited access to most major railways for one price. There are a few etiquette tips that will serve you well while in Japan. One is to not use a mobile phone while on a public transportation. Another is to respect business cards when they are handed to you, read them closely, and preferably have your own business card to hand them.

Meet other travelers and explore the cities on foot with one of the free walking tours available. There are also many free parks, such as the bamboo forest.

People here are very polite, and strictly follow rules. You wouldn’t want to be seen eating and walking at the same time, and take care not to litter as the streets are kept very clean.

Teams & Open Roles

The sockets used in Japan are the same ones used in North America. The standard voltage is 100 W, so you will need a converter.

Tattoos are uncommon in Japan, and in the onsen they are forbidden in some places.
Public Wi fi is rare, so when you arrive you should either get a portable wi fi hotspot or get a SIM card for your unlocked phone, and pay about $10 a day for wi fi.

Convenience stores are called kombini, and they are easy places to use the bathroom and find English speaker friendly foods.

There are plenty of one of a kind activities to do in Japan. You can watch a sumo wrestling match, or stay overnight at one of the temples. There are also things like traditional cooking classes so you can learn to make sushi and ramen to impress all of your friends back home.

Learning a few key phrases in Japan will help a lot in communicating, because English is not common. Before eating, it is common to say itadakimasu together, which is “I humbly receive”.

Learning a few key phrases in Japan will help a lot in communicating, because English is not common. Before eating, it is common to say itadakimasu together, which is “I humbly receive”.

People have lived in Japan for thousands of years. Many aspects of its culture are still preserved in the traditions, and some rural towns from the samurai days have unique stories to tell. You can still see geishas, and the capital is home to one of the biggest fads in the world: manga.

There is a strict etiquette and sets of unspoken rules followed here, and it would be good to research about the ins and outs of eating, such as proper use of chopsticks (don’t pass food from chopstick to chopstick, stick it upright in rice, or rub them together). Other points to consider are not to be a picky eater. The Japanese follow a tradition to never fill your own glass at a party. Another etiquette tip is to give up your seat to people in need.

See unique natural sites, and explore this mysterious island. It’s known to be one of the most progressive places in the world, and Japan welcomes visitors from every continent. Read our website to learn more.